met-star.jpgIt’s late and I’ve run into a bit of a problem – I’m getting knee deep into designing a series of promotional materials for a band/client of mine. Now while I’ve got a keen sense of design naturally, and many years of basic Photoshop experience, my abilities are usually limited to designing logos and graphics strictly for the web.

And even those abilities are limited. When it comes to real-deal graphic design, there are many different software programs such as Adobe Illustrator and Quark that, while I’ve tinkered with in the past for various jobs, I never really got to feel out.

In fact, I personally did all design for projects in the past, including evolvor.com, in Photoshop, with mediocre results. You can thank Paulie for the newest web 2.0-ish evolvor logo (which looks great, and we are working on new graphics as well).

So, I’m getting into more detailed work because now I’m handling print materials
, which if aren’t done right are not going to look good. It’s real easy to do something that looks okay on a computer screen, but look like crap once it hits a printer. I know this from projects dating back to 2001 when I did some early, music related collage work for friends one year at christmas.

As I dip my feet into the more technical aspects of logo and graphic design, I’ll share some resources with you in case you find yourself in a similar situation.

The first may be actually coming up with the initial ideas – which led me to this list of the top 40 logo inspiration resources.

You’re probably going to be working on a text logo, so check out these 51 photoshop text effect tutorials.

Once you have an idea or design you can see how different kinds of actual logos were created with these 50 logo design resources.

And because every band at some point is on a tight budget, here’s some important open source graphic design links to software alternatives you won’t have to pay for.

Now get to work!